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A Reason for Learning



The Book of Proverbs declares, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; Fools despise wisdom and instruction.”1 Education is one of the most effective weapons of change. Christian Education is one of the most effective weapons in combating the world’s influences on the next generation.2

Before we can get into the how of learning we must understand the reason for learning.

Historically, America has a rich heritage of education. In the early years of this country, education was centered around the Bible. The purpose of learning to read was to be able to read the Bible. James Deuink and Carl Herbster, authors of Effective Christian School Management, stated, “One of the more prominent examples of this religious purpose was the Old Deluder Satan Act, passed by the General Court of Massachusetts in 1647. Acknowledging that a purpose of Satan is to keep men from knowledge, the act provided for the instruction of youth to thwart him. It required that all towns of fifty householders or larger appoint someone to teach children to read and write.”3

The Scripture has much to say about teaching and learning.

  • 1 Timothy 4:11, “Prescribe and teach these things...”

  • Luke 20:21, “They questioned Him saying, ‘Teacher, we know that You speak and teach correctly, and You are not partial to any, but teach the way of God in truth.’”

  • Matthew 5:2, “He (Jesus) opened His mouth and began to teach them...”

  • In Job 6:24 the Word says, “Teach me, and I will be silent; and show me how I have erred.”

  • Proverbs 1:5, “A wise man will hear and increase in learning, and a man of understanding will acquire wise counsel,”

  • Proverbs 9:9, “Give instruction to a wise man and he will be still wiser, teach a righteous man and he will increase his learning.”

  • Ephesians 5:10, “...trying to learn what is pleasing to the Lord.”

“Traditional education is based on the idea that education is teaching individuals language and subject matter whereas progressive education is based on the idea that education is changing the social values of individuals as defined by the government or education system...Traditional education was founded on the view that man was created by God, is sinful in nature, and need the absolute authority of God’s Word; progressive education was founded on the view that man has evolved, is good in nature and cannot rely on any absolutes.”4

The school community is the place for learning. The major aim of Christian education here at Crossroads Christian School is to lead students to become fully committed followers of Christ. Teachers are actively leading and guiding students to be disciples of Jesus. This involves grasping and understanding what God teaches in His Word. Students are being taught a biblical worldview so they can understand how to live in the society around them and still maintain their Christian values and ethics.5 Teaching “Knowledge-that” shows what a student understands. “Knowledge-how” is the set of skills and abilities that a student possesses. “Knowledge-why” refers to the set of values and ethics that guide a student’s decisions. “Knowledge-with” helps students form healthy relationships and learning, involves much more than the intellectual comprehension and analysis.6

Here at CCS, effective teaching and learning incorporates all four of these to form our balanced curriculum, and that is a good reason for learning.


 

1 Unless otherwise indicated, all Bible references are from the New American Standard Version (NASB)1995

2 Brandon Ewing, Why Christian Schools Fail, Kindle e-book, 2016. n.p.

3 Deuink, James W. and Carl D. Herbster, Effective Christian School Management, (Greenville, SC: B. Jones University Press, 1982) n.p. 4 Baker, A.A. The Successful Christian School, (Pensacola FL: A Beka Book, 2004) n.p. 5 Harro Van Brummelen, Walking with God in the Classroom, 3rd ed. (Colorado Springs: Purposeful Design Press, 2009) n.p.

6 Brummelen, Walking with God in the Classroom. n.p.


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